New Little League Baseball Pitch Count Rules

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Good to see that Little League Baseball is again modifying their pitching rules to protect our youth baseball pitchers.  I’ve commented on this in my newsletters in the past, but I was not thrilled watching the Little League World Series this year and watching the coaches manipulate and take advantage of loop holes within the pitch count rules.  I am all about winning, but these rules are in place to protect our youth.

The rules for 2010 will now apply to both the regular season and tournament, which were different last year.

Read the full story at Little League’s website.

Also, be sure to read my past article on Preventing Little League Pitching Injuries.

 

2010 Little League Baseball Regular Season and Tournament Pitching Rules

Pitchers league age 14 and under must adhere to the following rest requirements:

  • If a player pitches 66 or more pitches in a day, four (4) calendar days of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 51 – 65 pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 36 – 50 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 21 – 35 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar day of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 1-20 pitches in a day, no (0) calendar day of rest is required.

Pitchers league age 15-18 must adhere to the following rest requirements:

  • If a player pitches 76 or more pitches in a day, four (4) calendar days of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 61 – 75 pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 46 – 60 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 31 -45 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar day of rest must be observed.
  • If a player pitches 1-30 pitches in a day, no (0) calendar day of rest is required.

 

 

Photo by The Suss-Man

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6 Responses to “New Little League Baseball Pitch Count Rules”

  1. Ryan Hartley, PT DPT November 30, 2009 at 8:58 pm

    Thanks, Mike. Hopefully these rules get enforced.

    One question – did anyone define "rest"? Many times kids will play another position on their non-pitching days, and if that position is catcher, third base, or outfield, their arm really isn't resting.

    As you mentioned in your post, many coaches and players (and worse, some parents), unfortunately look for loopholes and don't really honor the spirit of throwing limits. These new limits are definitely a step in the right direction, though. Thanks again for passing this along!

  2. continuingedofanatc December 1, 2009 at 9:38 am

    Mike-

    Thanks for passing on the information.

    Quick Question – These rules are specific to the brand "Little League Baseball" and a part of their new pitching rules, correct?

    At the same time, these rules were created for a reason – to protect young pitchers from the vast array of injuries that can accompany high pitch counts.

    With that in mind, is it your belief that these same pitch counts really should be in effect for at least 90-95% of high school pitchers and for all of those travel league pitchers that pitch in 2-3 leagues a week and then tournaments every weekend in the summer as well?

    Little League Baseball makes up only a percentage of the baseball played in this country. And so this is a great start that hopefully other organizations will follow. The real work is getting these rules passed down through to the non-Little League Travel associations, the house leagues, and the NFHS which works with state high school associations to administrate rules at the high school level.

    Thanks again,

    Bill White, ATC

  3. Bill, absolutely. We use pitch counts, to a certain extent, even at the professional level!

  4. My son went past the pitch count by two pitches, if he wanted to pitch 2 days later…but those two pitches were a continuation of the batter he was facing at a 32 pitch count…doesnt the new rule apply to this situation that enables you to go past the limit to finish up with a batter?

  5. Id like to know the same answer to the Anonymous guys question. June 16, 2010 3:30 pm question.

  6. Anonymous,

    This is a little late, but I didn’t see a response. In the situation you mentioned, your son threw 32 pitches. With 32 pitches, he would require 1 calendar day of rest. He would not be able to pitch the next day after his pitching day, but would be available the following day after the day of rest. What you haven’t mentioned is your son’s age, and that would help determine how many pitches he’s allowed to throw in a day.