Functional Stability Training of the Core – Live Seminar with Eric Cressey and Myself

It is with great pleasure that Eric Cressey and I are announcing a new live seminar that we are conducting this November.  We will be speaking on a new collaborative system that we are putting together for rehabilitation and performance training, called Functional Stability Training, and how to apply it specifically to the core.  I have been alluding to this over the past year or so in many of my articles and the system is a concept I have been thinking about for a long time.

 

Functional Stability Training

In order to function properly our joints need to be mobile, but control of this mobility is often less than optimal.  Unfortunately, this stabilization is often overlooked in the design or rehabilitation and performance programs.  Traditional program design relies too much on stretching what is tight and strengthening what is weak.  We are missing the boat on stabilization.

Basically, Functional Stability Training is how I approach building my rehabilitation programs for injured people and how Eric and I build corrective exercise progressions for performance training.  It is the integration of physical therapy and performance enhancement training, the integration of exercises and manual techniques, and the integration between mobility, strengthening, and dynamic stabilization.

If you have taken my course at ShoulderSeminar.com or watched Eric and I’s Optimal Shoulder Performance DVD, then you know a little but about the basics of Functional Stability Training as it applies to the shoulder.  We are going to expand on that even more.

 

Functional Stability Training for the Core

This seminar will specifically discuss Functional Stability Training for the Core.  This isn’t the standard exercise progression for the core with sit ups, infomercial gimmicks and medicine ball tosses.  Rather, this is training the core to work the way it was intended to work – to provide stabilization of the trunk while simultaneously moving the extremities during functional activities.

Once you have trained the core to function properly on it’s own, functional exercise positions and progressions can occur.  Far too often we are all guilty of skipping steps or not mastering the basics before moving to advanced progressions.  This will only assure the reinforcement of poor movement patterns and lead to future muscle imbalances.

The progressions discussed are applicable to rehabilitation, injury prevention, and performance enhancement programs.  For the rehabilitation specialist, the information will help you get away from traditional passive treatments and low back rehab exercise.  For the fitness and performance specialists, the information will help you achieve new progress with your clients to maximize functional and athletic potential.

There are a lot of “core training” programs out there.  Functional Stability Training of the Core is not intended to swamp you with the basics like non-functional anatomy of the spine.  Rather, this program quickly gets into technique and will show you a simplified approach to think about the core based on the TRUE FUNCTION of the core.  Simple, yet highly effective.

The seminar will be held at Cressey Performance in Hudson, MA (not too far outside Boston) on Sunday November 20, 2011.

Here is our current agenda:

  • Functional Stability Training – An integrated approach to rehabilitation and performance training – Reinold
  • Recent Advances in Core Performance - Understand the concept of Functional Stability Training for the Core, true function of the spine, and how this impacts injuries, rehab, and training – Reinold
  • Maintaining a Training Effect in Spite of Common Lumbar Spine and Lower Extremity Injuries – Outlines the causes and symptoms of several common injuries encountered in the lower extremity, and how to train around these issues to keep clients/athletes fit during rehabilitation – Cressey
  • Understanding and Controlling Extension in Athletes – Looks into the causes of and problems with excessive lumbar extension, anterior pelvic tilt, and rib flairs in athletes – Cressey
  • LAB – Assessing Core Movement Quality:  Understanding where to begin with Functional Stability Training exercises for the core – Reinold
  • LAB – A Dynamic Progression of Core Performance Exercises  – Progression from simple core control to advanced rehab and training techniques – Reinold
  • LAB Understanding and Controlling Extension in Athletes – Progresses on the previous lecture with specific technique and coaching cues for exercises aimed toward those with these common issues – Cressey
  • LAB Advanced Stability: Training Power Outside the Sagittal Plane – Traditional power training programs are predominantly focused on the sagittal plane, but in most athletic endeavors – especially rotational sports – power must be displayed in other planes of motion – Cressey

 

Register Now

You can view more information and register for the seminar at FunctionalStability.com:

 

WARNING:  There are only 50 spots available for this live seminar.  Last seminar that Eric and I conducted, Optimal Shoulder Performance, sold out in just a week.  We fully expect this course to sell out in days.

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3 Responses to “Functional Stability Training of the Core – Live Seminar with Eric Cressey and Myself”

  1. Mike, the link seems to be broken. When I click on it it takes me to an error page. Also, what is the cost of the registration, and are you and Eric planning to offer this one on dvd for those of us that can’t make the seminar? Thanks

    • Sorry, link fixed, thanks! The seminar info is all at FunctionalStability.com. At this time Eric and I are focused on producing the live seminar, we may consider making a DVD in the future. Thanks

  2. Mike,
    I recently took your online shoulder course. I really enjoyed it, thank you. I’m looking forward to your functional core training seminar. I’m curious if you have heard of Paul Check’s Scientific Core Conditioning course and what you think of it.
    Thanks,
    Moshe Richmond