How to Improve Overhead Shoulder Mobility

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on my How to Improve Overhead Shoulder Mobility is now available.

 

How to Improve Overhead Shoulder Mobility

Improving Overhead Shoulder MobilityThis month’s Inner Circle webinar is on how to improve overhead shoulder mobility.  In this webinar I’ll discuss:

  • We we are losing overhead shoulder mobility
  • Why it matters
  • The 4 main reasons why we lose overhead mobility
  • How the body compensates when we lose overhead mobility
  • How to assess for a loss of overhead shoulder mobility
  • What you MUST stop doing immediately with people that have lost overhead mobility – you are making them worse!
  • Corrective exercises to enhance overhead position
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve mobility

 

To access this webinar:

Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques is now available.

Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques

Integrated Manual Therapy TechniquesThis month’s Inner Circle webinar was on Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques.  This is essentially my manual therapy system.

In this presentation, I overview how I integrate different manual therapy techniques to provide consistent and predictable results.  By combining several different techniques in a logical and sequential order, you can make rapid results with your clients.

Enhancing Overhead Shoulder Mobility

Enhancing Overhead Shoulder MobilityOverhead shoulder mobility is one of the things that a large majority of people could all improve on if addressed appropriately.  This seems to be limited in a very large percentage of people, especially in those with shoulder pain and dysfunction.  Perhaps it has to do with our seated postures or our more sedentary lifestyles, but regardless limited overhead shoulder mobility is probably going to cause issues if not addressed.

 

Enhancing Overhead Shoulder Mobility

Here is a clip from my brand new educational program with Eric Cressey, Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body.  In the clip I am assessing someone with limited overhead shoulder mobility.  During the assessment it became clear that he had a few issues limiting his mobility, but I wanted to demonstrate how a few simple manual therapy techniques can clear up this pattern rather quickly if assessed and treated appropriately.

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It really goes back down to a proper assessment and know what you are looking for when assessing people.  This is just a very small clip of some of the great information we cover in our new program, which is on sale for $20 off this week (sale ends Sunday May 18th at midnight EST).   Click here or the image below to order now before the sale ends!

Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body

Strategies for Anterior Pelvic Tilt

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the Strategies for Anterior Pelvic Tilt is now available.

Strategis for Anterior Pelvic Tilt

strategies for anterior pelvic tiltThis month’s Inner Circle webinar was on Strategies for Anterior Pelvic Tilt.  I go through my system of how I integrate manual therapy, self-myofascial release, stretching, and correcting exercises.  To me, it’s all how you put the program together.  My system builds off each step to maximize the effectiveness of your programs.

 

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member 0f the Inner Circle program.

5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using

5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldnt Be DoingThe latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the 5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using is now available.

5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using

This month’s Inner Circle webinar was on 5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using.  Don’t get me wrong, I do perform stretches with people, but I think we often over utilize them as well.  Here are 5 stretches that are pretty common, why I think we overuse them, and what to do about it.

 

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member 0f the Inner Circle program.

IASTMtechnique.com On Sale To Celebrate Receiving CEU Approval

iastm-boxI am very excited to announce IASTMtechnique.com has officially been approved for 6 CEU contact hours by the NATA and the MA State APTA!  You can also submit for approval with other states and organizations, we provide everything you need on the course lesson page.

In honor of our course approval, Erson and I are going to put the course on sale again for this week only!

The sale price will be available until midnight Sunday EST.  Click here to save $30 and get 6 CEU hours!

Join the several 100s of people that have already gone through the program and are giving it awesome reviews!   IASTM is a really effective manual therapy technique that is easy to learn and doesn’t have to be expensive to perform.  Erson and I show you exactly how we use IASTM and how you can started using the technique quickly and easily!

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Click Here to Start Learning IASTM Today

 

 

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Can Tight Hip Flexors Cause Tight Hamstrings?

I like the title of this article – Can Tight Hip Flexors Cause Tight Hamstrings?  It is sort of like a riddle, isn’t it?

I was working with a client recently that is knowledgable and understands anatomy fairly well.  He came to see me for several reasons, but high on the list was “my hamstrings are tight” followed by a poor attempt at touching their toes.  His hands were about 3 inches from the floor with his knees bent!  He added, “I don’t know why I can’t touch my toes, I have been stretching and working on my hamstrings for months!”

After spending time assessing him from head-to-toe, I shared with him that I thought his hamstrings were “tight” because his hip flexors were tight.  He thought about it for a second and then tried to call BS, stating “If my hamstrings are tight, shouldn’t my hip flexors be loose?”

My answer was “I don’t think your hamstrings are tight.”  At this point, he was about ready to leave the session, thinking I was the craziest person in the world, stating “but I can’t touch my toes?!?”

 

How Tight Hip Flexors Can Cause Tight Hamstrings

I bet you’ve had clients like this in the past.  They know just enough to be dangerous.  The answer to my riddle is more semantics than anything else.  Yes, hamstring tightness can limit your ability to touch your toes, but that isn’t the only cause.

We have actually done a great job understanding this concept over the last several years.  People like Gray Cook, Lee Burton, Brett Jones, and others have done wonders teaching many people that sometimes there are other reasons why you can have a limited toe-touch, specifically because of poor motor control and core stabilization.

However, hip flexor tightness can be a contributor as well, as backwards as that seems.  Again, it comes down to semantics.  I am actually talking about anterior pelvic tilt limiting your ability to touch your toes.

Here is an interesting an example.  Which hamstring is shorter in the below image?

hip flexor hamstring tightness

If you answered the left leg, you are guessing!  Without a comprehensive exam, you are just guessing.  What if his left pelvis was anterior tilted?  This would cause the proximal attachment of the hamstring to move superiorly and look just like a tight hamstring, such as in this example:

tight hamstring anterior pelvic tilt

Whenever someone appears to have tight hamstrings or can not touch their toes, I look first at pelvic alignment to see if they are in excessive anterior tilt.  Everything revolves around assessing your starting point.

As you can see in the example below, if you are starting in a large anterior pelvic tilt, then you are theoretically starting with the hamstrings long.  I used the simple math numbers of 45 degrees and 90 degrees, which is pretty excessive, but you see what I mean.  In a large anterior pelvic tilt, your normal starting position in this example would already be close to 45 degrees!

Anterior Pelvic Tilt

So, can having tight hip flexors cause tight hamstrings?  I’m not sure about that.  But I know that being in anterior pelvic tilt can limit your ability to touch your toes.  Again, it always comes down to:

Functional-Stability-Training-Lower-Body

Assess, Don’t Assume

This is one of my major concepts from the Functional Stability Training for the Lower Body program.  Assess alignment before you just start treating.  Resist the urge to just foam rolling, massaging, and stretching your hamstrings without truly assessing if this is the reason why you can’t touch your toes.  Sometime having tight hip flexors and an anterior pelvic tilt can limit your ability to touch your toes just as much.

Self Myofascial Release for the Teres Major

Self-myofascial release teres majorA couple of months ago I wrote an article about the importance of the teres major muscle and how I often find it an area of tightness in my clients.  I recommended focusing on that area during manual therapy and some of your self myofascial release techniques.

I’ve had a lot of readers ask for more information so I wanted to share a video of how I perform some of the self-myofascial techniques.  My preferred technique is to use a trigger point ball or lacrosse ball against a wall (read my recommendations for which self myofascial release tools to use).

I see the teres major limiting horizontal adduction, arm elevation, and disassociation of the shoulder and scapula.  Again, if you haven’t read my previous article on the teres major go back and read more about this.  For the self-myofascial release techniques, we’ll work on these three areas.

I always start by rolling out the area and pausing on any tight/sore spots.  Most people stop there, but I think it is important to incorporate some movement with the self-myofascial release techniques.  In this video, I show you how I work the teres major during both horizontal adduction and arm elevation.  It is pretty hard to stretch the teres major, but I usually recommend following the self myofascial release for the teres major up with the cross body genie stretch.  This could also work well for the latissimus and even posterior rotator cuff.

 

Self Myofascial Release for the Teres Major

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