Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques is now available.

Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques

Integrated Manual Therapy TechniquesThis month’s Inner Circle webinar was on Integrating Manual Therapy Techniques.  This is essentially my manual therapy system.

In this presentation, I overview how I integrate different manual therapy techniques to provide consistent and predictable results.  By combining several different techniques in a logical and sequential order, you can make rapid results with your clients.

Enhancing Overhead Shoulder Mobility

Enhancing Overhead Shoulder MobilityOverhead shoulder mobility is one of the things that a large majority of people could all improve on if addressed appropriately.  This seems to be limited in a very large percentage of people, especially in those with shoulder pain and dysfunction.  Perhaps it has to do with our seated postures or our more sedentary lifestyles, but regardless limited overhead shoulder mobility is probably going to cause issues if not addressed.

 

Enhancing Overhead Shoulder Mobility

Here is a clip from my brand new educational program with Eric Cressey, Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body.  In the clip I am assessing someone with limited overhead shoulder mobility.  During the assessment it became clear that he had a few issues limiting his mobility, but I wanted to demonstrate how a few simple manual therapy techniques can clear up this pattern rather quickly if assessed and treated appropriately.

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It really goes back down to a proper assessment and know what you are looking for when assessing people.  This is just a very small clip of some of the great information we cover in our new program, which is on sale for $20 off this week (sale ends Sunday May 18th at midnight EST).   Click here or the image below to order now before the sale ends!

Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body

Strategies for Anterior Pelvic Tilt

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the Strategies for Anterior Pelvic Tilt is now available.

Strategis for Anterior Pelvic Tilt

strategies for anterior pelvic tiltThis month’s Inner Circle webinar was on Strategies for Anterior Pelvic Tilt.  I go through my system of how I integrate manual therapy, self-myofascial release, stretching, and correcting exercises.  To me, it’s all how you put the program together.  My system builds off each step to maximize the effectiveness of your programs.

 

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member 0f the Inner Circle program.

5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using

5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldnt Be DoingThe latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the 5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using is now available.

5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using

This month’s Inner Circle webinar was on 5 Common Stretches We Probably Shouldn’t Be Using.  Don’t get me wrong, I do perform stretches with people, but I think we often over utilize them as well.  Here are 5 stretches that are pretty common, why I think we overuse them, and what to do about it.

 

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member 0f the Inner Circle program.

IASTMtechnique.com On Sale To Celebrate Receiving CEU Approval

iastm-boxI am very excited to announce IASTMtechnique.com has officially been approved for 6 CEU contact hours by the NATA and the MA State APTA!  You can also submit for approval with other states and organizations, we provide everything you need on the course lesson page.

In honor of our course approval, Erson and I are going to put the course on sale again for this week only!

The sale price will be available until midnight Sunday EST.  Click here to save $30 and get 6 CEU hours!

Join the several 100s of people that have already gone through the program and are giving it awesome reviews!   IASTM is a really effective manual therapy technique that is easy to learn and doesn’t have to be expensive to perform.  Erson and I show you exactly how we use IASTM and how you can started using the technique quickly and easily!

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Click Here to Start Learning IASTM Today

 

 

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Can Tight Hip Flexors Cause Tight Hamstrings?

I like the title of this article – Can Tight Hip Flexors Cause Tight Hamstrings?  It is sort of like a riddle, isn’t it?

I was working with a client recently that is knowledgable and understands anatomy fairly well.  He came to see me for several reasons, but high on the list was “my hamstrings are tight” followed by a poor attempt at touching their toes.  His hands were about 3 inches from the floor with his knees bent!  He added, “I don’t know why I can’t touch my toes, I have been stretching and working on my hamstrings for months!”

After spending time assessing him from head-to-toe, I shared with him that I thought his hamstrings were “tight” because his hip flexors were tight.  He thought about it for a second and then tried to call BS, stating “If my hamstrings are tight, shouldn’t my hip flexors be loose?”

My answer was “I don’t think your hamstrings are tight.”  At this point, he was about ready to leave the session, thinking I was the craziest person in the world, stating “but I can’t touch my toes?!?”

 

How Tight Hip Flexors Can Cause Tight Hamstrings

I bet you’ve had clients like this in the past.  They know just enough to be dangerous.  The answer to my riddle is more semantics than anything else.  Yes, hamstring tightness can limit your ability to touch your toes, but that isn’t the only cause.

We have actually done a great job understanding this concept over the last several years.  People like Gray Cook, Lee Burton, Brett Jones, and others have done wonders teaching many people that sometimes there are other reasons why you can have a limited toe-touch, specifically because of poor motor control and core stabilization.

However, hip flexor tightness can be a contributor as well, as backwards as that seems.  Again, it comes down to semantics.  I am actually talking about anterior pelvic tilt limiting your ability to touch your toes.

Here is an interesting an example.  Which hamstring is shorter in the below image?

hip flexor hamstring tightness

If you answered the left leg, you are guessing!  Without a comprehensive exam, you are just guessing.  What if his left pelvis was anterior tilted?  This would cause the proximal attachment of the hamstring to move superiorly and look just like a tight hamstring, such as in this example:

tight hamstring anterior pelvic tilt

Whenever someone appears to have tight hamstrings or can not touch their toes, I look first at pelvic alignment to see if they are in excessive anterior tilt.  Everything revolves around assessing your starting point.

As you can see in the example below, if you are starting in a large anterior pelvic tilt, then you are theoretically starting with the hamstrings long.  I used the simple math numbers of 45 degrees and 90 degrees, which is pretty excessive, but you see what I mean.  In a large anterior pelvic tilt, your normal starting position in this example would already be close to 45 degrees!

Anterior Pelvic Tilt

So, can having tight hip flexors cause tight hamstrings?  I’m not sure about that.  But I know that being in anterior pelvic tilt can limit your ability to touch your toes.  Again, it always comes down to:

Functional-Stability-Training-Lower-Body

Assess, Don’t Assume

This is one of my major concepts from the Functional Stability Training for the Lower Body program.  Assess alignment before you just start treating.  Resist the urge to just foam rolling, massaging, and stretching your hamstrings without truly assessing if this is the reason why you can’t touch your toes.  Sometime having tight hip flexors and an anterior pelvic tilt can limit your ability to touch your toes just as much.

Self Myofascial Release for the Teres Major

Self-myofascial release teres majorA couple of months ago I wrote an article about the importance of the teres major muscle and how I often find it an area of tightness in my clients.  I recommended focusing on that area during manual therapy and some of your self myofascial release techniques.

I’ve had a lot of readers ask for more information so I wanted to share a video of how I perform some of the self-myofascial techniques.  My preferred technique is to use a trigger point ball or lacrosse ball against a wall (read my recommendations for which self myofascial release tools to use).

I see the teres major limiting horizontal adduction, arm elevation, and disassociation of the shoulder and scapula.  Again, if you haven’t read my previous article on the teres major go back and read more about this.  For the self-myofascial release techniques, we’ll work on these three areas.

I always start by rolling out the area and pausing on any tight/sore spots.  Most people stop there, but I think it is important to incorporate some movement with the self-myofascial release techniques.  In this video, I show you how I work the teres major during both horizontal adduction and arm elevation.  It is pretty hard to stretch the teres major, but I usually recommend following the self myofascial release for the teres major up with the cross body genie stretch.  This could also work well for the latissimus and even posterior rotator cuff.

 

Self Myofascial Release for the Teres Major

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How to Get the Most Out of the Start of Your Baseball Offseason Training

It’s been a long summer of baseball and it is time to start thinking about your offseason training program!

Some people think of the offseason as a time to rest, or to get away from baseball, or to do everything they can to dominate again next season. I’ve seen every spectrum of player, from the player that wants to just sit in a tree stand until February to the player that comes in to train the first day of the offseason.

Offseason training programs in baseball are now standard.  Believe it or not, this was not the case 20 years ago.  However, I think there is another golden opportunity that many players do not take advantage of at the start of the offseason.  Think of it as setting the foundation to prepare your body to get the most out of your offseason training.

Here is what I recommend and do with all my athletes at this time of year to get the most out of the start of your baseball offseason training.

 

Take Time Off From Throwing and Baseball

baseball offseason

Photo by Steve Garner

One of the most important aspects to the start of the baseball offseason is to take a step back and get away from baseball.  While this may seem counterintuitive, I do believe it is critical to your long term success.

For professional baseball pitchers in MLB, the start of the offseason means spending time with family, golfing, hunting, fishing, and probably taking a well deserved vacation to somewhere tropical.  It’s a long season, both physically and mentally.

I wouldn’t say that a summer of baseball is much easier for the younger baseball players, either.  Between traveling teams, tournaments, showcases, and grinding away at practice, the summer is almost as busy as the pro players!  I actually joke with some of my high school and college baseball pitchers that they can’t wait to go back to school to take a vacation from their summer baseball travel schedule!

But there are important physical benefits of taking time off as well.  Throwing a baseball is hard on your body and creates cumulative stress.  Furthermore, several studies have been published showing that the more your pitch, the greater your chances of injury:

  • Pitching for greater than 8 months out of the year results in 5x as many injuries (Olsen AJSM 06)
  • Pitching greater than 100 innings in one year results in 3x as many injuries (Fleisig AJSM 2011)
  • Pitching in showcases and travel leagues significantly correlated to increased injuries (Register-Mahlick JAT 12, Olsen AJSM 06)

I have found that my younger athletes that play a sport like soccer in the fall, tend to look better to me over time.  Sure, that is purely anecdotal.  But specializing in a very unilateral sport may actually limit some of your athletic potential, especially when you are in the certain younger age ranges where athletic development occurs.  Everything is baseball tends to be to one side.  Righties always rotate to the left when throwing and swinging, heck everyone even runs to the left around the bases!

There is plenty of time to get ready for next spring.  Take some time off in the fall and let your body heal up.  You aren’t going to forget how to pitch or lose your release point or feel.  You’ll come back stronger next season.

 

Regen Your Body

baseball regen

Photo by Niko Paix

Tough travel schedule, long hours in a car, bus, or  plane, cheap hotels, bad food, lack of sleep, inconsistent schedule.  Sound familiar?  That is a baseball season.  It’s tougher than you would think on your body.

All of these factors, and more, wear down your body and it’s ability to regenerate.  The constant stress to your body is a grind that drains your energy, increases your fatigue and soreness after an outing, and lengthens the time your body needs to fully recover between outings.

In order to get all that you can out of your off season training, you need to regen your body first.  This begins with the first principle above and taking time away from throwing, but there are also other things you can do to reset and regenerate your body.  You body needs to heal and sleep and nutrition are two great things to focus on at the start of the offseason.  Here are  a few things I recommend:

  • Get on a consistent sleep schedule
  • Sleep at least 8 hours a night
  • Eat a clean diet while avoiding fast food and processed foods
  • Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

Think of it as allowing your body to get back to neutral so you can start building on a solid foundation during the offseason.  You don’t want to start your offseason training with your body worn down.

 

Clean Up Any Past or Lingering Injuries

baseball offseason trainingI’m always amazed at the amount of people that limp through a baseball season and think that taking some downtime after the season is going to cure all their aches and pains.  What happens many times is that they take time off and then start training or preparing for next season and find out they may feel better but they didn’t address their past injuries.  They still have deficits.  If you wait until you start throwing again to find this out, it’s too late.

All my athletes start the offseason out with a thorough assessment that looks at all past areas of injury, regardless of whether or not they are currently symptomatic.

Many times, strength deficits, scar tissue, fibrosis, and several imbalances are still present after an injury, even if your are playing without concern.  Your body is really good at adapting and compensating.  It will find a way to perform.  This is likely one of the reasons that the number one predictor of future injury is past injury, meaning if you strain your hamstring, you are more likely to strain it again.  You probably never adequately addressed the concern.

You have to dig deep and find the root cause of the injury as well as clean up the mess created from the injury itself.  Remember, many injuries occur due to deficits elsewhere in the body.  Sometimes that elbow soreness is coming from your shoulder, for example.  Resting at the start of the offseason is great for the elbow, but you didn’t address the cause of your elbow symptoms.

 

Rebalance Your Portfolio

baseball assessmentIn the financial world, the concept of rebalancing your portfolio is one of the cornerstones of sound investing.  Essentially at periodic intervals you should assess your current portfolio balance and adjust based on the performance of your assets.  As some of your stocks go up and others potentially go down, your top performers are probably taking up a very large percentage of your portfolio and skewing your balance.

By rebalancing your portfolio at the end of the year, you assure that you redistribute your assets evenly and minimize your risk.

This same concept is important for baseball training.

After a long season of wear and tear you no doubt are going to have imbalances.  This happens even if you get through the season injury-free.  I say this often, but throwing a baseball is not natural for your body.  You’ll have areas of tightness and looseness, you’ll have areas of strength and weakness.  You’ll have imbalances and asymmetries.

In my studies on professional baseball pitchers (you can find some of my published data here and here), and an article on baseball shoulder adaptations), I have found many things:

  • You will lose shoulder internal rotation (if you don’t manage this during the season)
  • Your will gain external rotation, which isn’t necessarily a good thing and needs to be addressed!
  • You will lose elbow extension
  • You will lose shoulder and scapular strength
  • You will lose overall body strength and power
  • Your posture and alignment will change

One of the most powerful things I can recommend for any baseball pitcher is that you get a thorough assessment at the end of the season.  This serves as the most important day to me in your offseason program and the cornerstone of what I do with my athletes.  We need to find out exactly how your body handled the season and adjusted over the way.  Everyone responds differently.

Without this knowledge, your just throwing a program together and hoping everything works out.  This may work one year, but it’s going to catch up to you eventually.  Probably right in the middle of next season!

 

Set a Foundation for the Start of Your Baseball Offseason Training

What is the purpose of all this?  Simply taking time off after a season isn’t enough anymore.  Simply jumping into an offseason baseball training program isn’t enough anymore.  Simply performing a baseball long toss program isn’t enough anymore.

You need to actively put yourself in the best position to succeed.  Offseason training is the norm now a days.  You used to be able to gain a competitive advantage by training your tail off all offseason, but your peers are doing this too.  You can set yourself apart by setting a strong foundation BEFORE your offseason training.  This is not as common and one of the biggest mistakes I see amateur baseball players make each offseason.

Set yourself apart by starting your offseason on the right path.  Take some time off, regen your body, get your past injuries evaluated, and go through a thorough assessment to find ways to maximize your bodies potential.  Do this before the start of your offseason training so you set a fantastic foundation to build upon.

Ready to get started?  Learn more about what we do for baseball offseason performance training at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance.

Champion Physical Therapy and Performance