Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy is now available.

 

Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy

Integrating Performance Based Physical TherapyThis month’s Inner Circle webinar is on Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy.  This presentation is actually my talk from the recent Champion Bridging the Gap From Rehab to Performance Seminar that we conducted in Boston last month.  

I wanted to share this with Inner Circle members as I feel the topic is important as performance based therapy is definitely the future of our professions.  Performance therapy is something that is performed to help people optimize themselves and improve performance, no matter what performance means to you.  You don’t need to be injured to benefit from performance therapy.  This is a lot of what we do at Champion and something that I really wanted to share.

We are actually going to be releasing an online version of the Champion Bridging the Gap From Rehab to Performance Seminar, which will include this presentation, plus others from Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Rob Sutton, and Kiefer Lammi.  

Inner Circle members can access my talk now, and get early access to purchase the seminar.  Everyone else will have to wait until the official launch next week!  Plus, if you’d like to purchase the seminar, I also have a $10 off coupon just for Inner Circle members.  All the links will be in the Inner Circle Dashboard.

This webinar will cover:

  • What is “performance therapy”
  • The need for a paradigm shift in what we do
  • What I look for in my movement assessments
  • The components of manual therapy I perform
  • How to integrate and maximize your outcomes with corrective exercises

 

To access this webinar:

 

An Easy Drill to Enhance Thoracic Extension

Thoracic mobility drills are commonly given to people to enhance mobility.  I have shown some common thoracic mobility drills in the past, and recently showed a newer muscle energy technique I have been using.  If you haven’t seen these yet, you should check them out:

 

One of my big principles of rehabilitation and corrective exercises is that you follow up mobility drills with some sort of activation or strengthening drill.  You want to use the body in this newly gained mobility.

For some reason, I feel like this is often ignored with thoracic mobility.

I would actually argue that a very common reason for having limited thoracic mobility is poor endurance into thoracic extension.  The muscles can’t maintain an extended posture and resort to the path of least resistance, a slouched posture.

If you are going to spend time working on thoracic extension mobility, you should follow that up by working on thoracic extension endurance.

In the video below I show an extremely easy way to start working on thoracic extension endurance.  Certainly not groundbreaking, but an important drill that is often overlooked.

 

An Easy Drill to Enhance Thoracic Extension

 

Learn How I Enhance Thoracic Mobility

If you want to learn more about how I enhance thoracic mobility, I have a presentation on Enhancing Thoracic Mobility.  I review some of the self mobility and manual therapy techniques I use to enhance thoracic mobility. This webinar will cover:

  • The importance of thoracic mobility
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve thoracic mobility
  • My favorite self mobility drills to improve thoracic mobility on your own
  • Correct exercises to enhance movement after gaining thoracic mobility
  • How to put it all together to maximize outcomes

To access this presentation:

 

 

Enhancing Thoracic Mobility

enhancing thoracic mobilityLimited mobility of the thoracic spine is a common finding and something that tends to get worse over time.  To me, it’s one of those “use it or lose it” types of mobility in the body.  Several issues can occur from limited thoracic mobility, such as shoulder, neck, and even low back pain.

Thoracic mobility drills are common, but only part of the puzzle.  I have a new presentation where I’ll be reviewing some of the self mobility, manual therapy techniques, and corrective exercises I use to enhance thoracic mobility.

 

Enhancing Thoracic Mobility

This presentation will cover:

  • The importance of thoracic mobility
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve thoracic mobility
  • My favorite self mobility drills to improve thoracic mobility on your own
  • Correct exercises to enhance movement after gaining thoracic mobility
  • How to put it all together to maximize outcomes

 

Access the Presentation

You can purchase access to this presentation for only $10, or join my online Inner Circle Mentorship program for only $10/month and gain access to this and ALL my past presentations, product discounts, exclusive content, member only forum, and more!

 

 

Thoracic Mobility Muscle Energy Technique

Have you ever worked with someone that never seemed to improve their thoracic mobility, especially thoracic rotation?

I work with the occasional person that doesn’t respond to many of the common thoracic mobility drills.  Sometimes their daily posture, especially if working a desk job for years, needs more than the simple drills.  Sometimes I feel that thoracic mobility limitations can be true mobility restrictions, but other times I also feel there may be some tone or guarding involved.

A common technique that can be used to enhance mobility drills, especially when tone is involved, is muscle energy technique, or MET.  Muscle energy is commonly used to enhance mobility in other areas of the body, like the shoulder or hamstring, but less frequently used for thoracic mobility for some reason.

In the video below I show a very easy muscle energy technique that you can use to enhance thoracic mobility into rotation.  This is very easy to perform on your own too.

Give it a try and let me know what you think, I’ve been pretty amazed at how much more mobility I can achieve in a short amount of time using this muscle energy technique, especially for those stubborn thoracic mobility limitations.

 

Thoracic Mobility Muscle Energy Technique

 

Learn How I Enhance Thoracic Mobility

If you want to learn more about how I enhance thoracic mobility, I have a presentation on Enhancing Thoracic Mobility.  I review some of the self mobility and manual therapy techniques I use to enhance thoracic mobility. This webinar will cover:

  • The importance of thoracic mobility
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve thoracic mobility
  • My favorite self mobility drills to improve thoracic mobility on your own
  • Correct exercises to enhance movement after gaining thoracic mobility
  • How to put it all together to maximize outcomes

To access this presentation:

 

Keys to Effectively Stretching the Forearm

Sometimes you do something and don’t even realize what it means when you do it.

I’ve always been complimented by my athletes and patients about how I stretch their forearms.  They tend to gravitate to me for a stretch.  Perhaps it’s because I’ve worked with so many baseball players with stiff forearms, but apparently my technique feels more effective to people.

As with everything else, I do put a lot of thought into my technique to stretch the forearm.  The issue I think I see with people is that they are solely focused on wrist flexion and extension, and miss the majority of the stretch this way.

I wanted to share a quick video demonstrating how I stretch stretch the forearm.  Not rocket science, but paying attention to the little details will surely help you stretch the forearm more effectively.

These same concepts can be applied if you are performed a forearm stretch on yourself.

 

Keys to Effectively Stretching the Forearm

Essentially what it comes down to is assuring you:

  • Lock out the elbow
  • Bring the wrist into flexion or extension
  • Also include pronation or supination
  • Assure that you are including all the fingers
  • Assure that the finger joints are not flexing, extend them too

Hope this helps you more effectively stretch the forearm!  Let me know what you think and if you do something different.

 

 

How to Know When to Push a Stiff and Painful Shoulder

If you have ever worked with someone with a stiff and painful shoulder, you know how challenging it can be to gain motion.  Regardless of if this is a postoperative shoulder or someone with adhesive capsulitis, push too hard or too fast often backfires and causes them to get worse!

One of the more common questions I get from students and new clinicians is – “how do you know when to push range of motion.”

Luckily, there is a pretty simple way to knowing when to push a stiff and painful shoulder and when to back off.

 

Assess End Feel

How to Know When to Push a Stiff and Painful ShoulderIn addition to assessing the quantity of motion, you should also assess the quality of motion.  This is essentially the “end feel,” or the quality of the end range of motion.

Every joint has a normal end feel.  Some common examples are:

  • Boney: Hard end feel of two bones approximating.  Elbow extension is a good example.
  • Capsular or Ligamentous: Often described as stretching a piece of leather.  This is normal joint end feel, such as with shoulder external rotation
  • Muscular: This is more like stretching a piece of rubber, like when stretching the hamstrings
  • Tissue Approximation: When the mobility is stopped because you run out of room to move, such as during elbow or knee flexion.
  • Empty: Pain does not allow you to get to the end of the range of motion, you stop in the middle of the range.
  • Spasm: An abrupt end of the movement that feels as if the person is in pain and guarded.  This feels like the muscles are stopping the motion and spasming.

 

Don’t Push Through a Spasm End Feel

A simple rule I have always followed and has helped me know when to push motion with a painful and stiff shoulder is to never push through a spasm end feel.

If someone presents with a spasm end feel, your primary treatment objective should switch from trying to gain motion to trying to reduce spasm.  Attempting to push through the spasm almost always backfires.

You’ll know you can push harder when the spasm end feel changes to a capsular end feel.  That’s your cue to get more aggressive.  But…  be careful!  It’s possible to push too hard or too fast again and revert back to a spasm end feel.

 

Learn How I Treat the Stiff Shoulder

If you are interested in mastering your understanding of the shoulder, I have an amazing sale going on right now for my acclaiming online program teaching you exactly how I evaluate and treat the shoulder!  You can save a HUGE $150 off the normal enrollment fee!

ShoulderSeminar.comThe online program at takes you through an 8-week program with new content added every week.  You can learn at your own pace in the comfort of your own home.  You’ll learn exactly how I approach:

  • The evaluation of the shoulder
  • Selecting exercises for the shoulder
  • Manual resistance and dynamic stabilization drills for the shoulder
  • Nonoperative and postoperative rehabilitation
  • Rotator cuff injuries
  • Shoulder instability
  • SLAP lesions
  • The stiff shoulder
  • Manual therapy for the shoulder

The program offers 21 CEU hours for the NATA and APTA of MA and 20 CEU hours through the NSCA.

Click below to save $150 off the program between now and November 1st:

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How to Perform and Advance Rhythmic Stabilization Drills

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on How to Perform and Advance Rhythmic Stabilization Drills is now available.

 

How to Perform and Advance Rhythmic Stabilization Drills

How to Perform and Advance Rhythmic Stabilization Drills Mike ReinoldThis month’s Inner Circle webinar is on How to Perform and Advance Rhythmic Stabilization Drills.  Rhythmic stabilization drills have become very popular since I discussed in my DVD Optimal Shoulder Performance several years ago.  These are easy and excellent drills to start working on dynamic stabilization.  However, I must say over the years I feel like people are getting pretty sloppy with these drills, which essentially makes them much less effective.  Just because an exercise is simple, doesn’t mean that we should be sloppy with how we perform.  In this inservice presentation, I discuss how to perform rhythmic stabilization drills and all the ways we advance them from simple to advanced.

In this webinar, we discuss:

  • Why rhythmic stabilization drills are a great way to start enhancing dynamic stability
  • How to perform basic rhythmic stabilizations
  • How to advance rhythmic stabilization drills by changing technique variables
  • How to know when to advance someone or scale back to get the most out of the drills

To access this webinar:

 

 

How to Improve Overhead Shoulder Mobility

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on my How to Improve Overhead Shoulder Mobility is now available.

 

How to Improve Overhead Shoulder Mobility

Improving Overhead Shoulder MobilityThis month’s Inner Circle webinar is on how to improve overhead shoulder mobility.  In this webinar I’ll discuss:

  • We we are losing overhead shoulder mobility
  • Why it matters
  • The 4 main reasons why we lose overhead mobility
  • How the body compensates when we lose overhead mobility
  • How to assess for a loss of overhead shoulder mobility
  • What you MUST stop doing immediately with people that have lost overhead mobility – you are making them worse!
  • Corrective exercises to enhance overhead position
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve mobility

 

To access this webinar:

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