4 Myths of IASTM

Instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) is really a great manual therapy skill to have in your tool box.  However, there are many myths and misconceptions regarding IASTM that I really believe are holding people back from getting started and seeing the benefits of IASTM in their practice.

In this video, Erson Religioso and I discuss some of the myths of IASTM that led us to develop our online educational program at IASTMtechnique.com to teach people how and why we use IASTM:

4 Myths of IASTM

 

To summarize some of the myths of IASTM discussed in the video:

  • IASTM MythsIASTM does not have to be expensive to learn or perform.  You do not need to spend tons of money on certification courses and crazy expensive tools.  Erson and I have a quick and easy online educational program at IASTMtechnique.com that will get you started right away.  We even talk about how you can get useable tools for as little as $5!
  • IASTM does not have to be complicated to learn.  If you are already performing manual therapy or massage, you know everything you need to know to start using IASTM.
  • IASTM should not make everyone black and blue!  Let me actually rephrase that for emphasis, IASTM is not about being so aggressive that you leave large purple marks and essentially produce superficial capillary hemorrhage.  Some redness and petechia is OK, but the over aggressive black and blue is not ideal.
  • IASTM tools do not provide as much feedback as my hands.  IASTM is a way to compliment your hands, it is not a replacement!  In fact, it gives you a different feel that really helps your palpation skills.

 

 

Learn How to Start Performing IASTM Today!

Erson Religioso and I’s online educational program will teach you everything you need to know to start using IASTM today!  IASTM does not have to be complicated to learn or expensive to start using.  Learn everything about IASTM including the history, efficacy, tool options, different stroke patterns, basic techniques, advanced techniques, and how to integrate IASTM into your current manual therapy skills and treatment programs!

IASTM Technique 2.0 has now be released with updated research, new content, and now includes how to perform cupping and use mobility bands!  Get started today!

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How and Why You Need to Learn IASTM

Learn IASTMErson Religioso and I have a nice video for you discussing why and how we both started using instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM).  Like many people, I held out initially as I wanted to hear and see more.  However, the more I learned the more interested I became.

IASTM has now become a game changer for me and something I deeply integrate into my manual therapy techniques, and think you should too.  It doesn’t have to be complicated, expensive, or time consuming to start using IASTM.

In this video, Erson and I describe how and why they both started using IASTM, how we integrate IASTM with other manual techniques and exercise, the major benefits of IASTM, and then some brief technique demonstrations.

 

How and Why You Need to Learn IASTM

 

Learn How to Start Performing IASTM Today!

Erson Religioso and I’s online educational program will teach you everything you need to know to start using IASTM today!  IASTM does not have to be complicated to learn or expensive to start using.  Learn everything about IASTM including the history, efficacy, tool options, different stroke patterns, basic techniques, advanced techniques, and how to integrate IASTM into your current manual therapy skills and treatment programs!

IASTM Technique 2.0 has now be released with updated research, new content, and now includes how to perform cupping and use mobility bands!  Get started today!

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How to Stabilize the Scapula During Shoulder Elevation

One of the most common compensations we see with people with limited overhead shoulder elevation is lateral winging of the scapula.  Anytime you have limited glenohumeral joint mobility, your scapulothoracic joint is going to try to pick up the slack to raise your arm overhead.

This is common in postoperative patients, but also anyone with limited shoulder elevation.

Stabilizing the scapula during range of motion is often recommended to focus your mobility more on the shoulder than the scapula.  As with everything else, as simple as this seems, there is right way, a wrong way, and a better way to stabilize the scapula during shoulder elevation.

In this video, I demonstrate the correct way to stabilize the scapula, and show some common errors that I often see.

 

How to Stabilize the Scapula During Shoulder Elevation

 

Learn Exactly How I Evaluate and Treat the Shoulder

Interested in learning more?  Join my acclaimed online program teaching you exactly how I evaluate and treat the shoulder.  It’s a comprehensive 8-week online line program that covers everything you need to know about clinical examination, dynamic stability drills, manual therapy techniques, rotator cuff injuries, labral tears, stiff shoulders, and more.
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Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy is now available.

 

Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy

Integrating Performance Based Physical TherapyThis month’s Inner Circle webinar is on Integrating Performance Based Physical Therapy.  This presentation is actually my talk from the recent Champion Bridging the Gap From Rehab to Performance Seminar that we conducted in Boston last month.  

I wanted to share this with Inner Circle members as I feel the topic is important as performance based therapy is definitely the future of our professions.  Performance therapy is something that is performed to help people optimize themselves and improve performance, no matter what performance means to you.  You don’t need to be injured to benefit from performance therapy.  This is a lot of what we do at Champion and something that I really wanted to share.

We are actually going to be releasing an online version of the Champion Bridging the Gap From Rehab to Performance Seminar, which will include this presentation, plus others from Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Rob Sutton, and Kiefer Lammi.  

Inner Circle members can access my talk now, and get early access to purchase the seminar.  Everyone else will have to wait until the official launch next week!  Plus, if you’d like to purchase the seminar, I also have a $10 off coupon just for Inner Circle members.  All the links will be in the Inner Circle Dashboard.

This webinar will cover:

  • What is “performance therapy”
  • The need for a paradigm shift in what we do
  • What I look for in my movement assessments
  • The components of manual therapy I perform
  • How to integrate and maximize your outcomes with corrective exercises

 

To access this webinar:

 

An Easy Drill to Enhance Thoracic Extension

Thoracic mobility drills are commonly given to people to enhance mobility.  I have shown some common thoracic mobility drills in the past, and recently showed a newer muscle energy technique I have been using.  If you haven’t seen these yet, you should check them out:

 

One of my big principles of rehabilitation and corrective exercises is that you follow up mobility drills with some sort of activation or strengthening drill.  You want to use the body in this newly gained mobility.

For some reason, I feel like this is often ignored with thoracic mobility.

I would actually argue that a very common reason for having limited thoracic mobility is poor endurance into thoracic extension.  The muscles can’t maintain an extended posture and resort to the path of least resistance, a slouched posture.

If you are going to spend time working on thoracic extension mobility, you should follow that up by working on thoracic extension endurance.

In the video below I show an extremely easy way to start working on thoracic extension endurance.  Certainly not groundbreaking, but an important drill that is often overlooked.

 

An Easy Drill to Enhance Thoracic Extension

 

Learn How I Enhance Thoracic Mobility

If you want to learn more about how I enhance thoracic mobility, I have a presentation on Enhancing Thoracic Mobility.  I review some of the self mobility and manual therapy techniques I use to enhance thoracic mobility. This webinar will cover:

  • The importance of thoracic mobility
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve thoracic mobility
  • My favorite self mobility drills to improve thoracic mobility on your own
  • Correct exercises to enhance movement after gaining thoracic mobility
  • How to put it all together to maximize outcomes

To access this presentation:

 

 

Enhancing Thoracic Mobility

enhancing thoracic mobilityLimited mobility of the thoracic spine is a common finding and something that tends to get worse over time.  To me, it’s one of those “use it or lose it” types of mobility in the body.  Several issues can occur from limited thoracic mobility, such as shoulder, neck, and even low back pain.

Thoracic mobility drills are common, but only part of the puzzle.  I have a new presentation where I’ll be reviewing some of the self mobility, manual therapy techniques, and corrective exercises I use to enhance thoracic mobility.

 

Enhancing Thoracic Mobility

This presentation will cover:

  • The importance of thoracic mobility
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve thoracic mobility
  • My favorite self mobility drills to improve thoracic mobility on your own
  • Correct exercises to enhance movement after gaining thoracic mobility
  • How to put it all together to maximize outcomes

 

Access the Presentation

You can purchase access to this presentation for only $10, or join my online Inner Circle Mentorship program for only $10/month and gain access to this and ALL my past presentations, product discounts, exclusive content, member only forum, and more!

 

 

Thoracic Mobility Muscle Energy Technique

Have you ever worked with someone that never seemed to improve their thoracic mobility, especially thoracic rotation?

I work with the occasional person that doesn’t respond to many of the common thoracic mobility drills.  Sometimes their daily posture, especially if working a desk job for years, needs more than the simple drills.  Sometimes I feel that thoracic mobility limitations can be true mobility restrictions, but other times I also feel there may be some tone or guarding involved.

A common technique that can be used to enhance mobility drills, especially when tone is involved, is muscle energy technique, or MET.  Muscle energy is commonly used to enhance mobility in other areas of the body, like the shoulder or hamstring, but less frequently used for thoracic mobility for some reason.

In the video below I show a very easy muscle energy technique that you can use to enhance thoracic mobility into rotation.  This is very easy to perform on your own too.

Give it a try and let me know what you think, I’ve been pretty amazed at how much more mobility I can achieve in a short amount of time using this muscle energy technique, especially for those stubborn thoracic mobility limitations.

 

Thoracic Mobility Muscle Energy Technique

 

Learn How I Enhance Thoracic Mobility

If you want to learn more about how I enhance thoracic mobility, I have a presentation on Enhancing Thoracic Mobility.  I review some of the self mobility and manual therapy techniques I use to enhance thoracic mobility. This webinar will cover:

  • The importance of thoracic mobility
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve thoracic mobility
  • My favorite self mobility drills to improve thoracic mobility on your own
  • Correct exercises to enhance movement after gaining thoracic mobility
  • How to put it all together to maximize outcomes

To access this presentation:

 

Keys to Effectively Stretching the Forearm

Sometimes you do something and don’t even realize what it means when you do it.

I’ve always been complimented by my athletes and patients about how I stretch their forearms.  They tend to gravitate to me for a stretch.  Perhaps it’s because I’ve worked with so many baseball players with stiff forearms, but apparently my technique feels more effective to people.

As with everything else, I do put a lot of thought into my technique to stretch the forearm.  The issue I think I see with people is that they are solely focused on wrist flexion and extension, and miss the majority of the stretch this way.

I wanted to share a quick video demonstrating how I stretch stretch the forearm.  Not rocket science, but paying attention to the little details will surely help you stretch the forearm more effectively.

These same concepts can be applied if you are performed a forearm stretch on yourself.

 

Keys to Effectively Stretching the Forearm

Essentially what it comes down to is assuring you:

  • Lock out the elbow
  • Bring the wrist into flexion or extension
  • Also include pronation or supination
  • Assure that you are including all the fingers
  • Assure that the finger joints are not flexing, extend them too

Hope this helps you more effectively stretch the forearm!  Let me know what you think and if you do something different.

 

 

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