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The Effect of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Loading on Muscle Activity During the Lunge

One thing I talk about a lot when it comes to training and rehabilitation is the need to train the body in all three planes.  This often requires moving in one plane of motion and stabilizing in the other two.   We are often very good at moving in the sagittal plane, and poor at stabilizing in the transverse and frontal planes.  This is a big topic of discussion in my program Functional Stability Training of the Lower Body.

To enhance this triplanar stability, we often attempt to facilitate greater contraction of the gluteus medius muscle during sagittal plane exercises.  The lunge in particular is a great exercise for triplanar stability as the narrow stance challenges strength in the sagittal plane and stability in the transverse and frontal planes.

 

The Effect of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Loading on Muscle Activity During the Lunge

The Effect of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Loading on Muscle Activity During the LungeA recent study was published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research that investigated the effect of holding a dumbbell in either the contralateral or ipsilateral hand during a split squat and forward lunge.  (Note: they called it a “walking lunge” but I am 99% certain it was a forward lunge, so I’m just going to say forward lunger in this article…  probably just semantics.)

The study found that:

  • Holding the dumbbell on the ipsilateral side had no effect on glute med activity.
  • Holding the dumbbell on the contralateral side resulted in a significant increase in glute med activity, but only during the forward lunge, not the split squat.

I was a bit surprised that glute med activity was not impacted during the split squat, but perhaps the static nature of the position inherently requires less transverse and frontal plane stability.

There was one other finding from this study that I thought was interesting.  Kinematic differences during the forward lunge were found between a group of trained individuals in comparison to a group without training experience.

This makes sense as the forward lunge is a complex movement pattern that requires an understanding of how to control the pattern.  It requires both mobility and stability, but also the ability to control the eccentric deceleration phase.

contralateral lungeHowever, there were no kinematic differences between training age during the split squat, meaning that both novice and experienced trainees performed the split squat in a similar fashion.  This make split squats a great exercise to incorporate in the early phases of training for those with limited training experience, eventually progressing to forward lunge as they get better at moving and stabilizing the pattern.

This helps solidify the use of split squats in our lunge regression system.

 

Implications

I like simple studies like this.  Having the rationale to make small tweaks to your program is what sets you apart.  It’s the small things that may not be obvious at first but will produce better results over time.

Based on these results, I would recommend using the split squat with bilateral dumbbells to maximize strength gains since a unilateral load did not alter glute med activity.  The split squat is more of a basic exercise, so why not just use it to work on strength gains in the novice trainee.  As the person progresses, you can add the forward lunge variation with a contralateral load to enhance triplanar stability.

 

 

 

A New Exercise for Strength and Stability of the Shoulder

The PronatorThere is not doubt that we need a strong and stable shoulder to maximize performance.  I recently started playing with a new device called The Pronator.  It’s a device designed to strengthen the forearm musculature.  Honestly, this little thing is a fantastic device for grip and forearm strength, but I also started using it with my shoulder exercises and think this may be a game changer!

Take a look at the video below.

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I see this very similar to performing bottom-up kettlebell exercises.  By having an offset weight, you need to work the shoulder in 3D to stabilize and move at the same time.  Pretty cool.  It essentially allows you to:

  • Develop stability in one plane of motion and strength in another
  • Train the cuff to fire and stabilize while moving the scapula

The product is brand new and very affordable at only $55.   I don’t often tell my audience that they need to buy a product, but I really think everyone should have this one.  I like it that much!

 

Laxity Does Not Mean Instability

Several years ago, when Eric Cressey and I released Optimal Shoulder Performance, I discussed the Beighton Laxity Scale and how I use it to determine the amount of laxity that individuals may possess.  This is just one of the many factors that go into how I design my rehabilitation and performance programs, as an individual’s amount of laxity influences program design.

Since then, I have started to hear comments from people that their clients may have Ehlers-Danlos syndromeLoeys-Dietz syndrome or Marfan syndrome because of their Beighton score.

 

Laxity is Normal

Beighton Scale Laxity InstabilityIf you Google “Beighton Score,” you see that this is a scale often used to diagnose the above hypermobility syndromes, however each has their own specific features.  A Beighton score is not the only factor involved, and actually is probably not the most important finding in any of these syndromes.

Laxity is not a syndrome, in fact, laxity is normal.

We all have a certain degree of laxity, you’ve probably seen many people along this spectrum from the really tight to the really loose.  A high Beighton score does not indicate that they have a syndrome or problem, it just helps determine where they sit in the laxity spectrum.

 

Laxity Does Not Mean Instability

While joint laxity is normal, a high amount of laxity does not necessarily mean you have instability.  Stability is a combination of the function of your static and dynamic stabilizing systems.  Instability is when you have an issue with either (or both) of the static and dynamic stabilizers.  Functional stability is the ability to dynamically stabilize a joint during functional activities to allow proper control and movement.  This is the basis behind our entire Functional Stability Training programs.

Check out this video of my friend Sam’s Beighton score.

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As you can see, Sam has a high Beighton score and a lot of joint laxity.  But Sam can deadlift over 2x her body weight.  That is laxity combined with functional stability.  She doesn’t have any problems because she can control her laxity.

Don’t automatically assume a lot of laxity is a bad thing, in fact many professional athletes possess a high amount of laxity.  Remember laxity is normal, does not mean instability, does not mean you have a clinical syndrome, and something you can control with the right program.

 

 

Base of Support and Core Stability

I work with with a lot of youth athletes, especially baseball players.  I am often amazed at how some of our younger athletes have such poor movement skills.  Many are 6 inches away from touching their toes!  I’m sure this is a trend this is not going away as our society spends more and more time staring at our iPhones and less on long term athletic development.

The body is great at compensating and finding the path of least resistance.  Here is a quick tip that you can apply to many different exercises to enhance core stability.

 

Base of Support

When the core and entire lumbopelvic region has poor motor control and stability, especially in the transverse and frontal planes, a way the body likes to compensate is by widening the base of support.  Here is an example of a young athlete performing a medicine ball chest pass.  Notice his base of support in the first photo.  This was his natural set up position.

Base of Support

 

By widening his base of support, he can likely generate more power during the exercise by making it more stable in general.  However, in a training environment, I want to assure that we develop both power and control.

By narrowing his base of support, as you can see in the second photo, he has to stabilize his core during the exercise and work on developing power while controlling the force of the ball.  This is going to have a more functional carry over into his sport.

Building athletes isn’t always just about strength and power, it’s also about movement quality and control.  Watch for compensations at the base of support for signs of poor lumbopelvic and core stability.

 

 

A New Exercise for Shoulder, Scapula, and Core Control

Today’s post in a guest post from my friend Tad Sayce, who is a strength coach in the Boston area that specializes in swimmers.  Tad shares a great exercise video that works shoulder, scapula, and core control.  I’m a big fan of “big bang for your buck” exercises that promote strength and stability in one exercise, which is something we talk a lot about in Functional Stability Training.  Tad came up with one that I am going start trying with my athletes.

Band Resisted Horizontal Abduction with a Press

As a former competitive swimmer, I can closely relate to the overhead athlete and the complications that can arise at the shoulder. As a strength and conditioning coach working predominately with swimmers, I am constantly looking to improve the durability of the shoulder. It is widely accepted that the shoulder operates at maximum efficiency in the presence of a stable base at the core. While I am a believer in the use of isolated exercises, today’s focus will be that of a more integrated effort. The video below demonstrates an exercise that facilitates shoulder, scapular and core activation: Band Resisted Horizontal Abduction with a Press. 

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As the name implies, the exercise combines resisted horizontal abduction with an anti-rotation press. It is encouraged to first master each exercise in isolation before attempting to combine them. This exercise is great for educating athletes about proper scapular movement, and also demonstrating the ability to maintain position in the presence of increasing tension. I particularly like this exercise because it incorporates both dynamic and static efforts. I typically program this exercise for sets of 5 holding for 5 seconds, or sets of 8 holding for 2 seconds.

About Tad Sayce

tad-sayceTad Sayce, Head Coach and Owner of Sayco Performance Athletics, located in Waltham, MA. Tad is a Strength and Conditioning specialist with a strong interest in the sport of swimming. Formerly, Tad was a competitive swimmer in the Big 10 Conference and Olympic Trials qualifier, as well as a USA Swimming club coach.  For more information please visit www.saycoperformance.com.

Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body

My latest educational program with Eric Cressey, Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body, is now available!  

FST for the Upper Body is the third program in out Functional Stability Training system, adding to the popular Core and Lower Body programs.  When Eric and I started to brainstorm what we wanted to teach with these programs, we wanted to share our approaches to rehabilitation and performance training, but more importantly how we integrate the two together.  This makes the FST products a great resource for any rehabilitation, fitness, or performance specialist.

 

Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body

Functional Stability Training for the Upper BodyIn order to function properly, our body needs to be strong and mobile, but control and stabilization of this mobility is often less than optimal.  Unfortunately, stabilization is often overlooked in the design of rehabilitation and performance programs.  Traditional program design relies too much on mobilizing what is tight and strengthening what is weak.  We are missing the boat on stabilization and it’s effect on enhancing optimal movement patterns.

Proper function of the upper extremities is complicated and requires the arm to work in conjunction with the scapula, thorax, cervical spine, and core to provide mobility, strength, and power to the entire body.  Any deficits in stability throughout the body’s kinetic chain can lead to injury, dysfunction, and a decrease in performance in the upper body.  FST for the Upper Body aims to help formulate rehabilitation and training programs designed to optimize how the upper body functions.

By addressing alignment, strength, mobility, and dynamic motor control, you can maximize your rehabilitation and training programs to reach optimal performance.

Think about a few of these:

  • Can the lumbopelvic and thoracic regions impact shoulder function?
  • Can the cervical spine impact the elbow?
  • Can scapular position decrease shoulder performance?

The answer to all of these questions is ABSOLUTELY!  Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body discusses all this and more, showing you exactly how you can assess and correct issues within the kinetic chain to optimize stability and performance of the upper extremity.

Here is an outline of the presentations and lab demonstrations that we perform.  Eric and I combine presentations with real life examples so you can see how we both manage specific individuals based on our assessments.  You get to see Eric and I at work together working with people:

  • How posture and position influence upper extremity function
  • Understanding and managing joint hypermobility
  • Understanding the elbow: functional anatomy, common injuries, and conditions
  • Elbow injuries: evaluation and management
  • Assessment and management of thoracic mobility restrictions
  • Assessment and management of muscles imbalances of the shoulder and scapula
  • Assessment and management of scapular position
  • Assessment and management of elbow epicondylitis

 

Optimal Shoulder Performance

For those that are familiar with Eric and I’s other education program Optimal Shoulder Performance, Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body takes this information to the next level by showing how we integrate the entire body to optimize upper body function.  

FST for the Upper Body integrates the concepts learned from FST for the Core and FST for the Lower Body, and serves as the sequel to their previous educational program, Optimal Shoulder Performance.  FST for the Upper Body is perfect as a stand alone program, but also builds off Optimal Shoulder Performance to help take your knowledge to the next level.  Putting the information from all of these products together will give you a complete understanding of how we approach our integration of rehabilitation and performance.

We had great reviews from the live filming of this program:

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Special Sale Price This Week Only

Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body is available now and is on sale for $20 off to celebrate the launch.  

If you haven’t purchased any of the other FST products in the past, you can get all three FST programs for the Upper Body, Core, and Lower Body together in one bundle and save another $20.

These special sale prices are for this week only and end Sunday May 18th at midnight EST.  Click below to learn more and order before this sale price ends!

 

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7 Reasons Why Corrective Exercises May Not Always Work

The latest webinar recording for Inner Circle members on Why Corrective Exercises Don’t Always Work is now available below.

Why Corrective Exercises Don’t Always Work

corrective exerciseThis month’s Inner Circle webinar discussed Why Corrective Exercises Don’t Always Work.  I felt like this was an important webinar to discuss the fact that correct exercises aren’t perfect.  In fact, many times they are ineffective.  In order to best use corrective exercises, you first need to understand why they sometimes do not work. In this webinar, I will discuss:

  • What exactly are corrective exercises?
  • Do corrective exercises always work?
  • 7 reasons why corrective exercises may not always work
  • What you can do to maximize the effectiveness of your corrective exercises

 

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member of the Inner Circle program.

A Simple Dynamic Stability Exercise for the Leg [Video Demo]

This week’s post is a video demonstration of a simple way to integrate reactive neuromuscular training (RNT) into your programming to enhance dynamic stabilization of the lower extremity.

Reactive Neuromuscular Training for Dynamic Stabilization of the Lower ExtremityIn this video, I show a client that has an ankle sprain.  While going through her rehabilitation, it became clear that she also needed balance training to really work her ankle, knee, and hip to stabilize during functional tasks.

To perform this exercise, you simple need a large resistance band (which are great from many stretching, strengthening, and stability exercises – here are the ones I use).  Loop the band around a rack or other object and step within the loop.  Place the band just above your knee.

I show a few exercise ideas in the video, progressing from simple balance, to unstable surfaces, to incorporating functional movements.  By using the band, you can emphasize training the bodu’s ability to stabilize in the frontal and transverse planes while performing a sagittal plane exercise.  This is essential to optimal function and a big key to my Functional Stability Training program.

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