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How Neural Tension Influences Hamstring Flexibility

Many people think they have tight hamstrings.  This may be the case for some but there are often times that people feel “tight” but aren’t really tight.

I’ve been playing around with how neural tension influences hamstring flexibility and have been having great results.

Watch this video below, which is a clip from my product Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement, to learn more about what I mean.

 

How Neural Tension Influences Hamstring Flexibility

 

Learn Exactly How I Optimize Movement

Want to learn even more about how I optimize movement?  Eric Cressey and I have teamed up on Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement, to show you exactly how we both assess, coach, and build programs designed to optimize movement.

Click the button below for more information and to sign up now!

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What Exactly is Optimal Movement Quality?

What exactly does optimal movement quality mean?

Have you ever thought of that?  How do you define “optimal” movement?”  I would argue optimal movement is slightly different for everyone as we are all unique.

However, I usually think of optimal movement as simply two things:

  1. Do the right joints move (and the wrong ones don’t)?
  2. Do the right muscles work (and the wrong ones don’t)?

Simple.

Watch this video below, which is a clip from my product Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement, to learn more about what I mean.

 

What is Optimal Movement Quality?

 

Learn Exactly How I Optimize Movement

Want to learn even more about how I optimize movement?  Eric Cressey and I have teamed up on Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement, to show you exactly how we both assess, coach, and build programs designed to optimize movement.

Click the button below for more information and to sign up now!

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Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement

I am super excited to announce that Eric Cressey and I have just released our latest collaboration, Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement!  Many are familiar with the Functional Stability Training series of products that Eric and I have released, and we are happy to add the fourth program to this popular series.

We are really proud of this new product and know that you’ll be able to better understand and optimize movement in your patients and clients after viewing this program!

In Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement, Eric and I discuss why and how we focus on optimizing movement, then show how we integrate these concepts into our assessments, rehabilitation, and strength training programs.

 

Functional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement

functional stability training optimizing movementFunctional Stability Training: Optimizing Movement is designed to help you enhance your rehabilitation, fitness, and sports performance programing by enhancing movement patterns.  By addressing alignment, strength, mobility, and dynamic motor control, you can maximize your rehabilitation and training programs to reach optimal performance.

The body is an amazing thing.  It adapts extremely well to stress and daily demands to improve efficiency of the body.  In essence, the body is excellent at moving from point A to point B.  Unfortunately, the body often tries to find the path of least resistance.  Imbalances in mobility, strength, and dynamic stability can result in compensatory patterns.

Sometimes “efficient” does not mean “optimal.”

FST Optimizing Movement aims to help formulate rehabilitation and training programs designed to optimize how well the body moves.

Eric and I share our thoughts and strategies on:

  • Why poor movement patterns occurs
  • What we consider optimal movement
  • How poor movement relates to common injuries
  • How to assess movement patterns
  • How to design programs designed to enhance movement
  • How to regress, progress, and coach exercises to optimize movement

 

 

Click below to learn more and start optimizing movement today!

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20% Off Functional Stability Training!

Hope everyone is having an awesome summer!  Eric Cressey and I were talking the other day and our conversation went something like this:

  • Cressey ReinoldEric: Hey we haven’t given our readers a sale on our products recently, we should do something for them.
  • Mike: Yup
  • Eric: When?
  • Mike: Next week?
  • Eric: OK
  • Mike: OK

That’s how we roll. Lot’s of planning involved…

 

20% Off Functional Stability Training – This Week Only!

There is no doubt that the Functional Stability Training series has been Eric and I’s most popular products.  In this series, we have modules covering our approach to rehab and training of the upper body, lower body, and core.  It’s essentially a snapshot of how we think when designing our programs.

functional stability trainingYou can get any (or all!) of the FST products for 20% off this week only as a special sale to our readers.  We really appreciate the support over the years and want to make sure we give at times as well.

No coupon code is needed, just purchase any FST product this week for 20% off.  That’s under $80 for each of the modules or under $240 for the whole bundle!  The sale runs until midnight EST on Sunday August 2nd:

>> Click here to purchase Functional Stability Training for 20% Off <<

 

 

 

 

Anterior Pelvic Tilt Influence on Squat Mechanics

anterior pelvic tilt influences squat mechanicsI feel like we’ve been discussing anterior pelvic tilt lately in several articles and an Inner Circle webinar on my strategies for fixing anterior pelvic tilt.  I wanted to show a video of a great example of how a simple assessment really tells you a lot about how pelvic positioning should influence how we coach exercises such as squats and deadlifts.

If you haven’t had a chance to read my past article on how anterior pelvic tilt influences hip range of motion, you should definitely start there.

In this video, I have a great example of a client that has limited knee to chest mobility and with boney impingement.  However, if we abduct the leg a bit, it clears the rim of the hip and has full mobility with no impingement.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Klh1QOk5vRs

As you can see, because he is in anterior pelvic tilt, he is prepositioned to start the motion in hip flexion, so therefor looks like he has limited mobility.  I have a past article on how anterior pelvic tilt influence hip flexion mobility, which discusses this a little more.

While you are working on their anterior pelvic tilt, you can work around some of their limitations.  I hate when people say there is only one way to squat or deadlift.

Our anatomy is so different for each individual.

Some need a wider stance while others need more narrow.  Some need toes out while some need more neutral.  Do what works best for your body, not what the text book says you are supposed to look like.

 

 

The Effect of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Loading on Muscle Activity During the Lunge

One thing I talk about a lot when it comes to training and rehabilitation is the need to train the body in all three planes.  This often requires moving in one plane of motion and stabilizing in the other two.   We are often very good at moving in the sagittal plane, and poor at stabilizing in the transverse and frontal planes.  This is a big topic of discussion in my program Functional Stability Training of the Lower Body.

To enhance this triplanar stability, we often attempt to facilitate greater contraction of the gluteus medius muscle during sagittal plane exercises.  The lunge in particular is a great exercise for triplanar stability as the narrow stance challenges strength in the sagittal plane and stability in the transverse and frontal planes.

 

The Effect of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Loading on Muscle Activity During the Lunge

The Effect of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Loading on Muscle Activity During the LungeA recent study was published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research that investigated the effect of holding a dumbbell in either the contralateral or ipsilateral hand during a split squat and forward lunge.  (Note: they called it a “walking lunge” but I am 99% certain it was a forward lunge, so I’m just going to say forward lunger in this article…  probably just semantics.)

The study found that:

  • Holding the dumbbell on the ipsilateral side had no effect on glute med activity.
  • Holding the dumbbell on the contralateral side resulted in a significant increase in glute med activity, but only during the forward lunge, not the split squat.

I was a bit surprised that glute med activity was not impacted during the split squat, but perhaps the static nature of the position inherently requires less transverse and frontal plane stability.

There was one other finding from this study that I thought was interesting.  Kinematic differences during the forward lunge were found between a group of trained individuals in comparison to a group without training experience.

This makes sense as the forward lunge is a complex movement pattern that requires an understanding of how to control the pattern.  It requires both mobility and stability, but also the ability to control the eccentric deceleration phase.

contralateral lungeHowever, there were no kinematic differences between training age during the split squat, meaning that both novice and experienced trainees performed the split squat in a similar fashion.  This make split squats a great exercise to incorporate in the early phases of training for those with limited training experience, eventually progressing to forward lunge as they get better at moving and stabilizing the pattern.

This helps solidify the use of split squats in our lunge regression system.

 

Implications

I like simple studies like this.  Having the rationale to make small tweaks to your program is what sets you apart.  It’s the small things that may not be obvious at first but will produce better results over time.

Based on these results, I would recommend using the split squat with bilateral dumbbells to maximize strength gains since a unilateral load did not alter glute med activity.  The split squat is more of a basic exercise, so why not just use it to work on strength gains in the novice trainee.  As the person progresses, you can add the forward lunge variation with a contralateral load to enhance triplanar stability.

 

 

 

A New Exercise for Strength and Stability of the Shoulder

The PronatorThere is not doubt that we need a strong and stable shoulder to maximize performance.  I recently started playing with a new device called The Pronator.  It’s a device designed to strengthen the forearm musculature.  Honestly, this little thing is a fantastic device for grip and forearm strength, but I also started using it with my shoulder exercises and think this may be a game changer!

Take a look at the video below.

I see this very similar to performing bottom-up kettlebell exercises.  By having an offset weight, you need to work the shoulder in 3D to stabilize and move at the same time.  Pretty cool.  It essentially allows you to:

  • Develop stability in one plane of motion and strength in another
  • Train the cuff to fire and stabilize while moving the scapula

The product is brand new and very affordable at only $55.   I don’t often tell my audience that they need to buy a product, but I really think everyone should have this one.  I like it that much!

 

Laxity Does Not Mean Instability

Several years ago, when Eric Cressey and I released Optimal Shoulder Performance, I discussed the Beighton Laxity Scale and how I use it to determine the amount of laxity that individuals may possess.  This is just one of the many factors that go into how I design my rehabilitation and performance programs, as an individual’s amount of laxity influences program design.

Since then, I have started to hear comments from people that their clients may have Ehlers-Danlos syndromeLoeys-Dietz syndrome or Marfan syndrome because of their Beighton score.

 

Laxity is Normal

Beighton Scale Laxity InstabilityIf you Google “Beighton Score,” you see that this is a scale often used to diagnose the above hypermobility syndromes, however each has their own specific features.  A Beighton score is not the only factor involved, and actually is probably not the most important finding in any of these syndromes.

Laxity is not a syndrome, in fact, laxity is normal.

We all have a certain degree of laxity, you’ve probably seen many people along this spectrum from the really tight to the really loose.  A high Beighton score does not indicate that they have a syndrome or problem, it just helps determine where they sit in the laxity spectrum.

 

Laxity Does Not Mean Instability

While joint laxity is normal, a high amount of laxity does not necessarily mean you have instability.  Stability is a combination of the function of your static and dynamic stabilizing systems.  Instability is when you have an issue with either (or both) of the static and dynamic stabilizers.  Functional stability is the ability to dynamically stabilize a joint during functional activities to allow proper control and movement.  This is the basis behind our entire Functional Stability Training programs.

Check out this video of my friend Sam’s Beighton score.

As you can see, Sam has a high Beighton score and a lot of joint laxity.  But Sam can deadlift over 2x her body weight.  That is laxity combined with functional stability.  She doesn’t have any problems because she can control her laxity.

Don’t automatically assume a lot of laxity is a bad thing, in fact many professional athletes possess a high amount of laxity.  Remember laxity is normal, does not mean instability, does not mean you have a clinical syndrome, and something you can control with the right program.

 

 

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