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A New Exercise for Strength and Stability of the Shoulder

The PronatorThere is not doubt that we need a strong and stable shoulder to maximize performance.  I recently started playing with a new device called The Pronator.  It’s a device designed to strengthen the forearm musculature.  Honestly, this little thing is a fantastic device for grip and forearm strength, but I also started using it with my shoulder exercises and think this may be a game changer!

Take a look at the video below.

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I see this very similar to performing bottom-up kettlebell exercises.  By having an offset weight, you need to work the shoulder in 3D to stabilize and move at the same time.  Pretty cool.  It essentially allows you to:

  • Develop stability in one plane of motion and strength in another
  • Train the cuff to fire and stabilize while moving the scapula

The product is brand new and very affordable at only $55.   I don’t often tell my audience that they need to buy a product, but I really think everyone should have this one.  I like it that much!

 

5 Tips for Treating Scapular Winging

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the 5 Tips for Treating Scapular Winging is now available.

5 Tips for Treating Scapular Winging

5 Tips for Treating Scapular WingingLast month’s Inner Circle webinar was on 5 Tips for Treating Scapular Winging.

In this presentation, I discuss how I treat some of the difficult patients with scapular winging.  I’ll overview 5 tips I use to facilitate better scapular movement and reduce winging.  These are great tips that really work when you have a significant amount of winging.

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member f the Inner Circle program.  If you are currently logged in, you will see the webinars below.  If not, please log in below and then scroll down to the “webinar archives” section.  If you are not a member, learn how to access this and ALL my other webinars for only $5.

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How to Cue the Scapula During Shoulder Exercises

In today’s video, I share my thoughts on the common cue of retracting your scapulae together while performing shoulder exercises.  I’m not sure this is the most advantageous cue, despite it’s popularity.  Instead, I focus on facilitating normal scapulohumeral motion.  I don’t want to restrict the scapula while moving the arm.

Learn more about how to cue the scapula during shoulder exercises in the video below.

 

How to Cue the Scapula During Shoulder Exercises

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Learn How I Evaluate and Treat the Shoulder

Want to learn exactly how I evaluate and treat the shoulder?  My 8-week online seminar at ShoulderSeminar.com covers everything you need to know from evaluation, to manual dynamic stabilization drills, to manual therapy of the shoulder, to specific rehab for stiff shoulders, instability, SLAP tears, and rotator cuff injuries.

ShoulderSeminar.com is on sale this month for $150 off.  This huge sale goes until the end of October 31st at midnight EST.  Sign up today and also get access to RehabWebinars.com for free for 1-month.  Click here to enroll in the program today, the sale ends at the end of the month!

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The Influence of Pain on Shoulder Biomechanics

The influence of pain on how well the shoulder moves and functions has been researched several times in the past.  It is often though that impaired movement patterns may lead to pain the shoulder.

A recent two part study published in JOSPT analyzed the biomechanics of the shoulder, scapula, and clavicle in people with and without shoulder pain to determine in differences existed between the groups.  Part one assessed the scapula and clavicle.  Part two assess the shoulder.

The subjects with pain were not in acute pain, but rather had chronic issues with their shoulders for an average of 10 years.  The authors used electromagnetic sensors that were rigidly fixed to transcortical bone screws and inserted into each of the bones to accurately track motion analysis.

The studies were interesting and worth a full read, but I wanted to discuss some of the highlights.

 

The Influence of Pain on Shoulder Biomechanics

In regard to the scapula, the authors found:

  • Upward rotation of the scapula less in subjects with pain
  • This decrease in upward rotation was present at lower angles of elevation, not in the overhead position

It is important to assess scapular upward rotation in people with shoulder pain, particularly emphasizing the beginning of motion.  Realize that no differences were observed in upward rotation past 60 degrees of elevation, implying that the symptomatic group’s upward rotation caught up to the asymptomatic group.  This may imply that there is a timing issue, more than a true lack of scapular upward elevation issue.  They are upwardly rotating, but perhaps just too late?

The study also found the following in regard to shoulder motion:

  • Shoulder elevation was greater in subjects with pain
  • This increase in shoulder elevation was present at lower angles of elevation, not in the overhead position

Noticed how I intentionally presented it similar to the scapula findings?  if you put the two finings together, it appears that people with shoulder pain have a higher ratio of shoulder movement in comparison to scapular movement at the beginning of arm elevation.  The shoulder caught up again overhead, so it appears that the timing between shoulder and scapular movement may have an impact.

The Influence of Pain on Shoulder Mechanics

As you can see, it is important to assess both shoulder and scapular movement together, and not in isolation, as movement impairments at one join likely influence the other.  The brain is exceptionally good at getting from point A to point B and finding the path of least resistance to get there.

I should note that in studies like this, it is impossible to tell if the pain caused the movement changes or the movement changes caused the pain.  So keep that in mind.  Regardless of causation, our treatment programs should be designed with these findings in mind.

There are so many other great findings in the study that I encourage everyone to explore these further, but I thought these findings were worth discussing.  Based on these findings, it appears worthwhile to assess the relative contribution of scapular and shoulder movement during the initial phases of shoulder elevation.

Interested in advancing your understanding of the shoulder?  My extensive online program teaching you exactly how I evaluate and treat the shoulder at ShoulderSeminar.com is on sale now for $150 off!  That is a huge discount that you don’t want to miss!  Click here to enroll in the program today, the sale ends at the end of the month!

ShoulderSeminar.com

 

 

 

Great Exercise to Enhance Posterior Shoulder Strength, Endurance, and Overhead Stability

I wanted to share an exercise I have been incorporating into my programs lately to develop posterior shoulder strength, endurance, and overhead stability.  I call it the ER Press as it combines shoulder external rotation in an abducted position with an overhead press.  When performed with exercise tubing, it provides an anterior force that the posterior musculature must resist during the movement.  The key is to resist the pull of the band while you press overhead.

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I use this drill a lot with my baseball players and overhead athletes.  I think it’s a great drill that hits many of the areas that I focus on when training a strong posterior chain of the trunk and arm.

It’s also becoming a favorite of my Crossfit and olympic lifting athletes, who are reporting that they feel more comfortable overhead and have more stability with their snatches and overhead squats.

There are numerous progressions that can be performed by simply changing the position the athlete is in, including tall kneeling, half kneel, and split squat stances.  You can also perform some rhythmic stabilizations at the top range of motion once to increase the challenge.

 

Assessing Scapular Position

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on the Assessing Scapular Position is now available.

Assessing Scapular Position

Assessing_Scapular_PositionThis month’s Inner Circle webinar was on Assessing Scapular Position.  While I have openly stated in the past that assessing scapular position is not as significant as looking at dynamic mobility, I do feel it is worth starting your assessment with position.  You have to know where to start to know where to go.  This is a great follow up to my past talk on Scapular Dyskinesis.

Here is how I assess scapular position, but more importantly how I integrate it into my assessment.

To access the webinar, please be sure you are logged in and are a member f the Inner Circle program.  If you are currently logged in, you will see the webinars below.  If not, please log in below and then scroll down to the “webinar archives” section.  If you are not a member, learn how to access this and ALL my other webinars for only $5.

Inner Circle Log in:

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A New Exercise for Shoulder, Scapula, and Core Control

Today’s post in a guest post from my friend Tad Sayce, who is a strength coach in the Boston area that specializes in swimmers.  Tad shares a great exercise video that works shoulder, scapula, and core control.  I’m a big fan of “big bang for your buck” exercises that promote strength and stability in one exercise, which is something we talk a lot about in Functional Stability Training.  Tad came up with one that I am going start trying with my athletes.

Band Resisted Horizontal Abduction with a Press

As a former competitive swimmer, I can closely relate to the overhead athlete and the complications that can arise at the shoulder. As a strength and conditioning coach working predominately with swimmers, I am constantly looking to improve the durability of the shoulder. It is widely accepted that the shoulder operates at maximum efficiency in the presence of a stable base at the core. While I am a believer in the use of isolated exercises, today’s focus will be that of a more integrated effort. The video below demonstrates an exercise that facilitates shoulder, scapular and core activation: Band Resisted Horizontal Abduction with a Press. 

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As the name implies, the exercise combines resisted horizontal abduction with an anti-rotation press. It is encouraged to first master each exercise in isolation before attempting to combine them. This exercise is great for educating athletes about proper scapular movement, and also demonstrating the ability to maintain position in the presence of increasing tension. I particularly like this exercise because it incorporates both dynamic and static efforts. I typically program this exercise for sets of 5 holding for 5 seconds, or sets of 8 holding for 2 seconds.

About Tad Sayce

tad-sayceTad Sayce, Head Coach and Owner of Sayco Performance Athletics, located in Waltham, MA. Tad is a Strength and Conditioning specialist with a strong interest in the sport of swimming. Formerly, Tad was a competitive swimmer in the Big 10 Conference and Olympic Trials qualifier, as well as a USA Swimming club coach.  For more information please visit www.saycoperformance.com.

Assessing Shoulder and Scapular Dynamic Mobility

Assessing Shoulder and Scapular Dynamic MobilityA thorough assessment of the shoulder must look at the posture and dynamic mobility of both the shoulder and scapula.  More importantly, we need to assess the interaction between the shoulder and scapula and not look at the two in isolation.

Assessing Shoulder and Scapular Dynamic Mobility

Altered scapular dynamic movement can be influenced by many things, so a thorough assessment is needed.  Here is a clip from my brand new educational program with Eric Cressey, Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body. This is part of a lab demonstration of Eric Cressey and I assessing overhead arm elevation and the quality of shoulder and scapular mobility.  In this clip you can clearly see a side-to-side difference and we discuss some of the potential implications:

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This is just a very small clip of some of the great information we cover in our new program, which is on sale for $20 off this week (sale ends Sunday May 18th at midnight EST).   Click here or the image below to order now before the sale ends!

Functional Stability Training for the Upper Body